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Unfair20 Fundraiser Auction

The Interviews

Want to start collecting art yourself? Well-known collectors Antoine de Werd and Bas Kuiper give some interesting insights into their own passion and share valuable tips for new collectors in two interviews below.

Curious to find out how some of the works on auction came to live? We’ve asked a couple of our participating artists about just that. Scroll down for the interviews with Janine van Oene, Thomas Trum, Anouk van Zwieten and Jaya Pelupessy!


The Collectors

Antoine de Werd

Antoine de Werd is a partner at GMW lawyers, specializing in divorce law.

What does art mean to you?
Art occupies a very important space in my life. I like to surround myself with art, lots of art. That is the visual input. Art can broaden your horizons and encourage thinking. That’s the other dimension. But also: being involved with art is also just a nice way to spend your time.

Do you regularly buy art at auctions? If so, how come?
I am not a seasoned auction buyer (yet), probably just due to awkwardness. I mostly buy from galleries. 

Why do you invest in the art of young, emerging artists?
I don’t think it’s a matter of investing per se. By buying art from the right young artists you can acquire work that will stand the test of time. You can continue to follow the artist from an early stage in their career development and simultaneously support that development. It’s fun and exciting. I like to watch work by young artists.

What attracts you to this auction, purely based on the

catalog?
The work of Tim Breukers, Koos Buster and Bonno van Doorn. For photography Maurice van Es and Gilleam Trappenberg.

How do you select what you buy? Do you follow your own taste or is there a hidden agenda?
The selection is first and foremost an intuitive one. I have to feel stimulated by a work. It has to really affect me.  I then try to find out more about the artist online. My taste is decisive, very rarely do I let someone else’s advice play a significant role.

If money were infinitely sufficient, who’s work would you buy?
Jackson Pollock, Richard Serra, Louis Morris, just to name a few from an infinite list.

What tips & tricks would you share with new buyers or starting collectors?
 Follow your gut feeling, your first reaction. Do not listen too much to what others say and certainly not to certain gallery owners, who often want to disclose too much unnecessary information. I at least can’t stand that. I want to look, not listen.

Portrait courtesy of Antoine de Werd


Bas Kuiper

Bas Kuiper is a psychologist and is co-founder of AMFAD (Amsterdam Fashion, Art & Design).

What does art mean to you?  
To me, art is the most important side issue in life. It is my mental oxygen. Through works of art you have a direct connection with their maker, with another person. Being a psychologist, I find this intriguing. Art continues to fascinate me and I enjoy the art around me every day.

Do you buy at auctions regularly? And if so why?  
Yes, I often buy works at auctions. Sometimes very good work is offered that is often a little older, which enables you to fill a gap in your collection. Other times there are works that seem to go unnoticed, which makes for a good opportunity to add a work to your collection at a good price.

Why do you invest in the art of young, emerging artists?
I think it is great to encourage young artists to create new work and in doing so enable them to keep developing. Also, prices are usually still quite low at the start of a person’s career.

What attracts you to this auction, based on the catalog?

It is a nice mix of young talents and artists who have been present in the field a little longer. I think it’s is a good reflection of what is happening in the art world right now. Plus it covers a variety of techniques.

How do you select what you buy yourself? Do you follow your own taste or is there a hidden agenda?The work must add something to my collection. I’m very much into material experiments. Furthermore, the artist and the work must have growth potential.

If money were infinitely sufficient, who’s art would you buy ? 
There are many artists that I would like to own work of. A few names: Mark Rothko, Francis Bacon, Cy Twombly, Cady Noland, Anselm Kiefer, Sterling Ruby, Paul McCarthy, Peter Doig, Neo Rauch, Mark Manders, Alicja Kwade and Nina Canell.

What tips can you give starting buyers or collectors?
Go and see a lot, in galleries, in museums, on the internet. Talk to gallery owners and artists. Look at the works that affect you. And pass the threshold of buying a first work of art. Just do
it, for example at the Unfair Fundraiser auction!

Portrait by René Frese.


The Artists

Janine van Oene

Janine van Oene (1989) lives and works in Amsterdam.  She graduated from HKU, Utrecht. Galerie Gisela Clement in Bonn, Germany. DNB Art Collection, ING Art Collection, Royal Art Collection, and various private collections have purchased works by Van Oene. 

Why are you participating in this auction?
Because Unfair is the nicest ‘fair’ in which I have been able to participate. This is due to the organizers, the way in which the exhibition is organized and I have met the best artists – friends through there. In addition, both times my work has been auctioned for a good amount, which is great for my wallet and in this way I can contribute to the development of the exhibition.

If you had all the money in the world, from whom would you buy work and why?
A painting by Charline von Heyl. Her painting practice is so rich, free and diverse that it works as a relief for me.

I learn a lot by looking at her work.  

What is the most important condition for you to be able to work?
If I feel good I can paint without doubting.
Doubting because of uncertainty and not being able to make choices during the process is my biggest enemy. I must therefore regularly remind myself of the words tranquility, cleanlinessand regularity. My work must look like it was made naturally and with ease. Then it has the power that I long for.

Do you ever buy art yourself?
I trade sometimes. I recently exchanged work with Thomas Trum and Nazif Lopulissa, whom I met two years ago through Unfair.

Do you ever think about where a work will end up?
I think that every painting deserves a presentation moment and for a while belongs to everyone. It is good for the value of my work if it is purchased by an important collector and ends up in an interesting collection, but in principle my work is for every enthusiast.

If your own work were auction for the highest price possible, what would you do with the money?
Right now I’m saving up for my upcoming (cowboy)holiday in Texas, US.

Portrait by Bibian Bingen
janinevanoene.nl@janine.van.oene

Lot nr. 20
Janine van Oene
Lorem Ipsum (2018)
oil paint on  canvas, 200x180cm

Would you like to place a bid on Janine’s work? Please send an email with the lot nr. and your bid amount to by clicking the button below. Bidding starts at a one-time rate of €500,-


Thomas Trum

Thomas Trum (1989) lives and works in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. He graduated from the Design Academy in Eindhoven. His work is part of  numerous collections, among others; Erasmus University Rotterdam, AkzoNobel Art Foundation and Noordbrabants Museum.

How did this work come about? Which themes do you investigate in this work?
The work is made with a self-developed broad felt-tip pen. A felt-tip pen can make a line that remains consistent, only at the onset you always see a slightly more saturated part. A brush on the other hand starts with a bold touch and runs out quickly, which changes the appearance of the line tremendously. The Marker Drawings focus on flat-filling single lines. A drawing of a person is of course not a real person, but a drawing of a line is actually a real line.

What do you hope your work will do with a space?
To color the space it is in.

What is the most important condition for you to be able to create new work?
Freedom, no deadlines for an exhibition or assignment, but a period in which I can experiment with all the ideas I have, without the immediate need for new work.

Have you ever participated in an auction before?
Yes, I participated in the previous Unfair Fundraiser.

Why are you participating in this auction?
Because I want to support Unfair, and of course I am very curious if my work will be auctioned this time round. 

 

 

Do you ever think about where a work will end up?
Yes, I always find this very interesting. All my works originate in my studio in Den Bosch, and from there they go in all directions.

Do you find it exciting to participate in an auction? What does the sale of a work mean to you?
This is what we do for a living, so selling is an important part of it.

Do you ever buy art yourself?
No  I don’t.

If you had all the money in the world, who’s work would you buy and why?
The black square of Malevich, best painting ever (at that time).

If your own work were to be sold for millions, what would you do with the money?
See if I could buy Malevich’s black square, or else I would make new works myself.

Portrait by Alberto Ferrero
thomastrum.nl / @thomastrum

Lot nr 10.
Thomas Trum
One Blue Line 40 (2019)
acrylic on 350grams paper, 104x80cm

Would you like to place a bid on Thomas’ work? Please send an email with the lot nr. and your bid amount to by clicking the button below. Bidding starts at a one-time rate of €500,-


Anouk van Zwieten

Anouk van Zwieten (1991) is an Amsterdam born artist that lives and works in Utrecht.  She holds a Bachelor degree in Fine Art (with honours) from HKU, Utrecht. Her work has been purchased by Sanquin Art Collection, De Nederlandsche Bank collection and the Albert Heijn Kunststichting.

How did this work come about? What was your inspiration?
Despite an apparent randomness, there are a number of image elements that have been reflected in my work for years. In the work that I made between 2015-2016 I started to paint cigarettes and goldfish in series. In 2017 I made a series of works called “breakfast”, in which I painted the daily breakfast ritual. Without exception, these visual elements are concrete and, precisely because of their relationship with the banality of everyday life, they are meaningful. These elements are still reflected in my work, also in “Tropical Fruit”. Over the years they have been transformed from realistic painted objects to fast forms and picturesque gestures.  

Which themes do you investigate in this work?
How is our behavior influenced on a daily basis? What moves us subconsciously? I incorporate this into my paintings by building up different layers. Everything I paint in the background is just as important as what is visible in the foreground. The elements that I paint to fade into the background,  form a sort of subconscious mind: not immediately visible but always present. And at times when I don’t expect it, hidden images, fascinations or experiences suddenly will appear on the surface again.

Have you ever participated in an auction before?

No, this is the first one!

Why do you participate in this auction?
I am curious about what my work will do at such an auction and how things operate at such an event. Moreover, I like to give something back to Unfair.

Do you ever think about where a work will end up after it’s sold?
Only when a work is ‘finished’ and has been in my studio for a while … I don’t really think about that while I’m still in the process of painting.

What do you hope your work will do with a space?
I especially hope that the people who put it up in their room are happy with it and give it their own spin.

 Do you find it exciting to participate in an auction?
I do find it exciting. Who knows, maybe my work will just come back home with me. It is always nice if someone sees something in your work and wants to buy it. That’s a big motivation of course.

Do you ever buy art yourself?
Mostly art books, and a lot of them, I now own a pretty big collection. I also have a number of works by fellow artists from just after graduating, when we all had to clean up our studios. They’re on my wall now. Buying art is not possible for me yet.

If you had all the money in the world, what artwork or which artist would you buy?
I have a lot of people around me whose work I would like to buy; it seems very nice to be able to do that.

If your own work were auctioned for the highest price possible, what would you do with the money?
I would maybe place a bid on one of the works myself!

Portrait by Vijay Slager
anoukvanzwieten.nl / @anoukvanzwieten

Lot nr. 01
Anouk van Zwieten
Tropisch Fruit (2019)
oil paint on canvas, 120x80cm

Would you like to place a bid on Anouk’s work? Please send an email with the lot nr. and your bid amount to by clicking the button below. Bidding starts at a one-time rate of €500,-


Jaya Pelupessy

Jaya Pelupessy (1989) lives and works in Utrecht. He graduated from HKU, Utrecht.  Pelupessy’s work has been included in the Tropenmuseum collection, Foam Collection, Steenbergen collection and various private collections. He was nominated for Foam Talent 2019.

How did this work come about? What was your inspiration?
Vitrine # 4 is part of the Flatten Image series. In this series I combine digital image elements with traditional photographic processes. During my photography I do a number of interventions in and before the camera. Templates and stencils that are visually reminiscent of the tools used in Photoshop (clone stamps, brush tools etc.) are placed in the camera during shooting. These interventions in combination with direct photography on photosensitive paper ensures that the works are unique and cannot be reproduced. The subjects I photograph refer to archaeological finds and product photography from the past. This is also a great source of inspiration for me; photography that should exude authenticity.

Which themes do you investigate in this work?
In all my works I do research into reproduction processes. In this project the emphasis is mainly on the volatile and reproducible status of the photographic object in contrast to the unique tangible product. Making my process a visual part of my end products is also a recurring theme in my work. In this work it is mainly reflected in the visible tape edges that reveal how the work came about.

Why are you participating in this auction?
Because I’m very fond of everyone at Unfair and sincerely hope this edition of the fundraiser will be top of the bill again. If I can contribute to it with my work that’s just great.

Do you ever think about where your work will end up?
Hell yes. For a previous project (The Studio Scultures), as a conceptual condition of the work, I chose to visit everyone who purchased a work and to reproduce to scale the location where the artwork was placed. This created a totally new relationship with my audience.

What do you hope your work will do with a space?
I would love it if the work could hold your

attention in a room for a moment and make you think about the constructions of an image.

What is the most important condition for you to be able to create new work?
The feeling that it’s allowed to fail is very important to me. But I don’t dare say the most important condition. That depends on too many factors at the same time.

Do you find it exciting to participate in an auction? What does the sale of a work mean to you?
No I don’t find it particularly exciting. I try to see the sales value and artistic value separately. Whether something sells, especially if it’s at an auction, depends on so many factors that I am not concerned about it. Selling work generally means that I can invest in new projects.

Do you ever buy art yourself?
No, I would have to sell more works to do that. I do exchange work with other artists.

If you had all the money in the world, which artwork would you want to own?
I find it very difficult to choose a work, but the first thing that comes to mind is the work of Marcel Duchamp; Boîte-en-valise. This is a suitcase made by the artist with reproductions of his own works. Duchamp is one of the first artists to investigate the status of the original in relation to its reproduction and the constructions that we assign to the art world in a conceptual way.

If your own work were to be auctioned for the highest price possible, what would you do with the money?
I would prefer to go to New Zealand, but it will probably go up to making new work. Maybe the two can be combined…

Portrait by Marcel Wogram
jayapelupessy.com / @jayapelupesssy

Lot nr. 23
Jaya Pelupessy
Vitrine #4 (2019)
direct negative photograph, 45x33cm

Would you like to place a bid on Jaya’s work?  Please send an email with the lot nr. and your bid amount to by clicking the button below. Bidding starts at a one-time rate of €500,-


SAVE THE DATE
Monday December 9th 2019
19:30 – Doors open
20:00 – Auction
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Oostenburgergracht 75